Patagonia Worn Wear Tour

Patagonia’s Worn Wear Tour will be stopping at The Brokedown Palace 11am-7pm on 26/27 April at our Boxpark , Shoreditch store and 28 April at the Spitalfields E1 Bishop’s Square event space.

worn wear

They will repair any broken garments  for free in their Worn Wear Van. Not just Patagonia clothing, but anything that needs repairing! They can only do 20 repairs in a day, so make sure you get there early.

Patagonia Worn Wear

Here’s what Patagonia say, “As individual consumers, the single best thing we can do for the planet is to keep our stuff in use longer. This simple act of extending the life of our garments through proper care and repair reduces the need to buy more over time—thereby avoiding the CO2 emissions, waste output and water usage required to build it.

We are taking this radical story to our communities across Europe on a 4,700km, 50 stop, 6 country tour. Our two CNG fuelled vans will be trucking across Europe offering free repairs on busted zippers, rips, tears, buttons and more (we fix all brands). We’ll also be showing people how to make simple repairs on clothes that have a second life left in them.

Find your nearest stop on Patagonia.com and on Patagonia’s Facebook Page.

If it’s broke, fix it!”

While on the road in the Northern Scotland, Patagonia climbing ambassador, Sean Villanueva O’Driscoll reflects on the garments that have accompanied him on expeditions all around the world.

“A piece that is full of patches and repairs has a spirit. It has a story attached to it!” says Sean. The stories we wear are worth hanging onto, repairing and using as long as possible. That’s the heart of Worn Wear and the story of Sean.

Share Your Stories! 
Keep up to date with the tour and share your Worn Wear stories. You can submit your favourite stories on your most loved gear over on the 
Worn Wear Tumblr page . Keep up to date with what’s happening out on the road by following Worn Wear on Instagram @WornWear and using the hastag #wornwear . You can also see the next stops on the tour and share info and invite friends and colleagues to your nearest Worn Wear event by checking out the events section over at the Patagonia Facebook page. 

Keep up to date with Worn Wear at the Palace over on our Instagram @thebrokedownpal.


Poler at the Palace Event Roundup

Poler Stuff brought their #campvibes to the city, with the Poler at the Palace event outside our Boxpark store.

Le TenteDee Dee and Ian chilling in Le Tente, enjoying the bucolic views out over Shoreditch High Street Station.

Steve Edge Le Tente
Shoreditch legend and friend of the Palace Steve Edge checking out the view in his Napsack.

Dee Dee and NoelDee Dee and our host Noel


Daily screenings of cult surf film “Freezing”

AllpressAllpress were selling coffee in a Silver Belles vintage airstream, in aid of Project Waterfall

Greenwood Guild
Tom from The Greenwood Guild demo’ing his carving skills

See more photos on Poler Stuff’s Facebook page here. 

 



Poler x Pendleton

North West is best! Our two favourite Oregonian brands have collaborated to create the Poler x Pendleton collection, featuring Pendleton’s traditional Journey West pattern in unique Poler Stuff colours. It includes classics such as Poler’s original Rolltop, The Rucksack, Napsack and Two Man Tent, as well as a Pendleton Blanket and oversized Beach Towel. Shop the collection in our Boxpark store or online now!

poler x pendleton 01 poler x pendleton 02 poler x pendleton 03 poler x pendleton 04 poler x pendleton 05 poler x pendleton 06 poler x pendleton 07 poler x pendleton 08 poler x pendleton 09 poler x pendleton 11 poler x pendleton 12 poler x pendleton 13 poler x pendleton 15

Photo credit: Benji Wagner


The Night Riviera to Cornwall

The Night Riviera Sleeper Train to Cornwall departs Paddington just before midnight and arrives in Truro at 7am the next morning – ideal for a long weekend of camping and surfing.

Once aboard the train we headed to the Dining Car for our complimentary tea and coffee, before bedding down in our cabin bunks. Our sleeper carriage attendant Jamie woke us with croissants and coffee at 6:30am.

We picked up our rental car and made a beeline for Watergate Bay, where the Watergate Bay Hotel offers coffee and a fantastic view of the crashing surf from their wicker furnished terrace. Watching one lone surfer on the waves, we decided to take some of the action, hiring boards from the friendly team at Extreme Academy right on the beach.

Post surf the tide had dropped significantly and exposed Watergate Bay’s massive sandy expanse, we spent what remained of the morning lounging on rocks and browsing pools for crabs before heading south. In Perranporth we found the Willow Bistro and shared voluminous bowls of salad, and mind altering mackerel.

08970012Alena exploring Watergate Bay wrapped in her Pendleton Jacquard Beach Towel

We set up camp at the fantastically located Beacon Cottage Farm Holidays, where our pitch was just right for the Poler Stuff Two Man Tent, the little car and a Primus-fuelled kitchen set up. Poler’s tents go up quick and easy and before long we were searching for a pub.

robin-poler-tent

Beacon Cottage Farm is hidden from the village of St Agnes by Beacon Hill, a high point of heather and gorse from which a lookout sent warning signals to nearby towns during the Napoleonic wars. Forty minutes of skirting the hill by foot leads to the village centre where the St Agnes Hotel and a myriad of other pubs serve booze and food. On our way back to the campsite we admired the sun as it faded over the Atlantic from Beacon Hill’s peak.

On Friday we woke to the sound of rain on canvas – one of the simple joys of camping in the UK. We made coffee in fog and drizzle, utilising the tent’s porch for shelter.

The shape of the Cornish peninsula produces several odd climatological phenomena and when the north coast is shrouded in clouds and mist, the south is often basking in the sun and vice versa. Bearing this in mind we left St Agnes behind and headed for Falmouth in search of sunshine and pasties.

We found not only the finest pasties in all of Kernow at Oggy Oggy on the High Street, but also, nestled in the woodland below Pendennis Castle, an excellent rope swing. After fish and chips and beer out the front of The Chain Locker, we headed back to our misty north coast encampment.

I’ve never heard of sea trout before but I’m glad the fishmonger recommended it to us. Fried over the the Primus Miner Stove with garlic, red onion and button mushrooms it made a killer topping for tagliatelle, similar to salmon but with added juice and oils.

08950004Cooking up some Sea Trout Tagliatelle with the Primus Mimer Stove Kit

On Saturday we woke to similarly wet and hazy weather and decided it would provide the perfect atmosphere for exploring the coast path as it flanks Beacon Cottage. In the murk we discovered the remains of old tin mines and the tiny picturesque cove of Chapel Porth.

Twenty minutes drive west along the south coast leads to Godrevy, a National Trust outpost on the far side of St Ives bay, where dunes and heathland back a massive expanse of sandy beach. Adding to our experience of odd Cornish weather events, unlike the St Agnes and Chapel Porth, Godrevy and Gwithian were enjoying a glorious early summer’s day.

IMG_2533The view from Godrevy across Gwithian Beach and St Ives Bay

Small but clean peeling waves broke uniformly on the mid tide, and we hired boards from the excellent Shore Surf School and had a really fun few hours, scoring plenty of fun but short rides. It had been over 15 years since I’d surfed in Cornwall and had completely forgotten the clear crystal water sparkled such intense turquoise in the sun. Post surf we had local ice cream from the Godrevy Beach Café, huddled together in my Pendleton massive beach towel.

That evening, zonked from spending the day in the sun we decided to forgo our camp stove cooking escapades and seek sustenance elsewhere, choosing the window stools of The Cornish Pizza Company, perfectly filling and nutritious after a day surfing and exploring in the sun. After a pint at the rickety wonky little Railway Inn, we wandered back to the tent in the darkness.

Half an hour down the coast from St Agnes lies the bustling little tourist metropole of St Ives, which seemed like the perfect place to spend Sunday. Our main motive for visiting was Tate St Ives and their Images Moving Out Onto Space exhibition, with work from Bridget Riley, Dan Flavin and amongst others my favourites John Divola and Bryan Winter, both of whom had their work installed in the curved gallery where a massive circular window looks out onto the mist clouded Porthmeor Beach, making it an epic but peaceful space.

08960008 Looking out over Porthmeor Beach from the window of Tate St Ives‘ curved gallery

We ate some super tasty chowder the Beach Comber Cafe and left St Ives to explore some of the villages and coastal paths further down the peninsula, finding a mystical landscape around Zennor.

08950031Keeping warm and dry with Patagonia Torrentshells in the mists of Zennor’s coastal path

Resigned to the fact our trip was coming to end, we headed to Truro Tandoori for a feast before we climbed back aboard the Night Riviera back to Paddington.


The Stour Valley Walk from Wye to Chilham

The Stour Valley Walk follows the River Stour through the stunning countryside of East Kent, from its source at Lenham to its estuary at Pegwell Bay. One of the most beautiful sections of this walk is between the villages of Wye and Chilham, passing through the rolling hills and ancient woodlands of the Kent Downs – an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It’s fast and easy to get to from London, and with pubs at each end, it makes a fantastic day out – and the perfect escape from the city.

Stour Valley Walk
Me on the walk with my Poler Stuff The Rucksack (I took the pockets off to make the ideal day pack)

Travel time from London:
1 hour

Getting there and back: High speed Southeastern train from St. Pancras or Stratford International, changing at Ashford to Wye (you can also get slower trains to Ashford from Victoria and Charing Cross).
Return from Chilham changing at Ashford for London.

Walk distance:
7 miles

Difficulty:
Easy – with some gentle ascents/descents.

Pitstops:
The Tickled Trout at Wye, The White Horse and The Wool Pack at Chilham, Shelly’s of Chilham tearooms.

The Tickled Trout
The Tickled Trout at Wye

Directions:
From the station at Wye cross over the bridge towards the village. The Tickled Trout is immediately on your left, we stopped here for a pre-walk pint in their idyllic beer garden on the banks of the River Stour. They have an excellent selection of local ales and ciders, and home cooked food.

stour-valley-1
A pre-walk pint at The Tickled Trout

After The Tickled Trout carry on up Bridge Street through the village, then turn left onto Church Street. From the church follow the route signs for the North Downs Way and Stour Valley Walk, you’ll pass through some abandoned college buildings. Cross the road and go up the lane opposite, where you’ll come out into open farmland. Here the Stour Valley Walk and the North Downs Way separate, from this point you should follow the heron way-markers for the Stour Valley Walk. Follow the path to the left cutting diagonally across the field towards woodland.

Stour Valley Walk
Ian in the woodland

Once through the woodland the path dips into the valley and you’ll have stunning views of the surrounding countryside.

Stour Valley Walk
Ian taking a sip of whisky from his hip flask, whilst enjoying the views

The path continues through coppiced woodland to open meadowland and the village of Crundale, it then follows an unmade road branching off to the left across cornfields.

Stour Valley Walk
Me in the open meadowland

Stour Valley Walk
Ian crossing the cornfields with his trusty Fjällräven Rucksack No. 21 

Follow the way-markers through dense woodland, where the path is lined with yew trees. The path follows several sections of fields and woodland, and as you approach Chilham, you will see views of the castle. The path then branches to your left over a stile, this link path then takes you back down to the river to the picturesque Chilham Mill.

Stour Valley Walk
Made some friends in the fields between Crundale and Chilham

Stour Valley Walk
The path through woodland just before you branch off to the mill

It’s worth making a detour at this point to see Chilham Village Square before getting the train back from Chilham. Follow the lane from the mill to the A28 Ashford Road, take care crossing. Follow Bagham Lane opposite, bearing to the left and up the hill. You’ll pass The Wool Pack at the bottom of the hill. In the main square you’ll find timber-framed houses, St. Mary’s Church Chilham and the imposing gateway to Chilham Castle, as well as 14th century pub The White Horse and Shelly’s of Chilham tearooms.

For Chilham Railway Station from Mill Lane, turn right on the main road (A28 Ashford Road), and it’s in about 150 metres on your right.

Chilham Village Square
Timber-framed house and St. Mary’s Church

The White Horse Chilham
The White Horse in Chilham

 stour valley walk